Increase of Arsenic in a Gluten Free Diet

Going Gluten Free

The Increase of Arsenic in a Gluten Free Diet

By Karen Brennan, MSW, NC, BCHN, Herbalist

brown rice

 

You may opt to go gluten free for various health reasons.  Avoiding gluten means avoiding gluten containing grains which are wheat, rye, barley, and spelt (and oats if it does not say gluten free). 

Many people who avoid these grains substitute with gluten free products. While I don’t recommend this substitution due to the still high processed carb and sugar content, there are also other reasons to be concerned.

Are you Getting too Much Arsenic in your Diet by going Gluten Free?

wheat-with x thru it

 

Many gluten free products contain brown rice and or white rice.   It is not so bad if you consume brown/white rice from time to time but if you eat gluten free products daily, chances are, you are consuming a lot rice.

  Some of these products contain 90 times more arsenic than what is allowed in drinking water.  Even low levels of arsenic can contribute to headaches, fatigue, brain fog, digestive issues respiratory illness and more.  Arsenic is found in brown rice at higher concentrations than what is found in white rice. Organic rice will contain arsenic too. 

Rice is grown in flooded fields and it absorbs more arsenic from the environment than any other crop.  Arsenic is a chemical element found naturally in our environment.  It is present in our soil, water and air.  Organic arsenic is used in pesticides and fertilizers.  When used this way, the arsenic can stay in the soil for years after crops are harvested.  For example, much of the rice harvested in the US is grown on former cotton fields where farmers used arsenic based pesticides to control weevils. 

Who Should Watch Their Arsenic Intake

Arsenic can accumulate in your hair, skin, nails and even in your internal organs. 

  • Pregnant women
  • Children and infants
  • People who eat a lot of rice
  • People who are on a gluten free diet

Symptoms of Arsenic Toxicity

(from low level, long term exposure (i.e.: gluten free diet))

This is not an exhaustive list but some of the more common/frequent symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Stomach pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Numbness of hands and feet
  • Higher rates of skin, bladder and lung cancer
  • Increase in heart disease
  • Skin and nail changes
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • headaches

How to Know if You Have High Arsenic Levels

Just because you are on a gluten free diet doesn’t mean you require testing.  This should be determined on an individual basis and is between you and your health care provider. 

On average, there is 10-20 milligrams of arsenic in the average human body.  Exceeding these levels can contribute to health problems.

  • Arsenic 24- hour urine test: this is the preferred test
  • Raid Urine Spot Test: this test is not as accurate
  • Blood Test: this can be used in conjunction with the 24-hour test and do monitor levels
  • Hair Mineral Analysis: You can request this test on your own and have your holistic nutritionist or ND go over the results with you.

How to Reduce Arsenic in Your Diet

 

  • Rice, wine and fruit juices can contain higher arsenic amounts than other foods
  • Organic foods do not necessarily contain less since arsenic is found in the soil
  • Talk to your doctor about giving rice cereal to your infant: consider other foods as your baby’s first food. Babies should have no more than one serving of rice cereal per day.
  • Limit the amount of gluten free products you consume such as gf pizza, bread, pasta and so forth.
  • Alternate your grains: Learn how to cook and bake using other grains such as millet, teff and quinoa
  • Brown rice contains 30-80% more arsenic than white rice. This is because it still contains the bran and germ portion of the kernel which is where most of the arsenic concentrates. 
  • If you do use brown rice opt for basmati as it will contain less arsenic. For white rice, opt for basmati as well, to reduce exposure.
  • Rinse your rice before use. This can reduce 25-30% of the arsenic content.

Bottom Line

Eat a well-balanced diet. You don’t have to eliminate rice products entirely from your diet but instead mix it up with other grains and fruits and vegetables. For instance, if you always eat your burger and sandwich on a gluten free bun, try a lettuce wrap or paleo coconut wraps.  Instead of having rice as a side dish, have quinoa, cauliflower rice, teff or millet.  Instead of brown rice pasta try lentil or quinoa pasta.  There are many options!

Research shows that while chelation may be good to remove heavy metals it may not be as effective to remove arsenic.  Instead a dietary protocol including  mineral supplementation can help to remove arsenic.  Depending on your level of toxicity, it may take up to 2 years to reduce toxic levels. 

 

Recipes

Here are some a couple gluten free recipes that do not contain brown rice/Visit my blog page for many more recipes

 

 

Sources

http://theceliacmd.com/2015/03/arsenic-in-rice-the-gluten-free-diet-facts-and-tips/

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm

http://drlwislon.com/articles/ARSENIC.htm

Haas, E.& Levin, B. (2006) Staying Healthy with Nutrition.  CA: Celestial Arts

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

Ginger: 12 Reasons Why You Should Be Consuming This Herb

Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

12 Reasons Why You Should Be Consuming It

ginger root

The underground portion of ginger is used.  The flesh of ginger may be white, yellow or red depending on the variety.  It has a light brownish skin. It has a aromatic, pungent and spicy smell and taste. 

Ginger has been used for thousands of years as an herbal remedy.  Modern medicine and research has proven that ginger possesses several therapeutic properties. 

Benefits to Using Ginger

  • Antioxidant Rich. And you only need a small amount to reap its benefits.  You want to consume a antioxidant rich diet to support overall health and prevent disease. 
  • Reduces Pain from Osteoarthritis: Ginger Inhibits the formation of inflammatory compounds and has direct anti-inflammatory effects. This is due to compounds called gingerols.  It has been shown to reduce pain in those with arthritis and muscular discomfort.  In one study, those who took ginger extract 2 times per day had less pain and needed less pain killing meds than those who took the placebo.  The dose in one study was 250 mg. 4 times daily. 
  • Provides Gastrointestinal Relief: Ginger is commonly used for an upset stomach, gas, diarrhea, and IBS.
  • Can Prevent Sea Sickness: It has been shown to be far superior to Dramamine, an OTC drug, used for motion sickness. It can reduce symptoms associated with motion sickness such as nausea, vomiting and cold sweat.  There is a reason that you see ginger candy in gift shops at boat docks to purchase!
  • Relief from Vomiting and Nausea Associated with Pregnancy: It can be useful even in the most severe form. And unlike anti-vomiting, drugs ginger is safe during pregnancy and only a small amount is required.  Pregnant women can safely take up to one gram. 
  • Protective against Colorectal Cancer. Gingerols which is the main active component in ginger is also the one responsible for its distinctive flavor.  This component may also inhibit the growth of human colorectal cancer cells.   
  • It can Induce Cell Death in Ovarian Cancer Cells. Again, this is thanks to the gingerols in ginger.  A pro-inflammatory state is thought to be important in the development of ovarian cancer. In the presence of ginger a few key indicators of inflammation were decreased in the ovarian cancer cells. 
  • Immune Boosting Properties. Since it has anti-viral properties, ginger can be useful to consume when you have a cold or flu or other viral infection.
  • Lowers Cholesterol and improves lipid metabolism. Studies show that ginger can have a dramatic effect on cardiovascular health. Studies used 250 micrograms of ginger
  • Anti-diabetic effects. In several studies ginger has been shown to help reduce blood sugar levels, regulate insulin response and also reduced body weight.
  • Use it for Colds and Sore Throat. It is a natural remedy to soothe an irritated throat.  Regular intake of ginger stimulates the secretion of mucus which soothes and provides throat relief.  Natural oi in ginger acts as an expectorant and thus not only useful for colds but also for upper respiratory infections, coughs, asthma and bronchitis 
  • Use for PMS cramp pain. A 2009 study found that 250 mg. 4 times a day was just as effective as ibuprofen for pain relief associated with a woman’s menstrual cycle. 

Ways to Incorporate Ginger into Your Diet

ginger-1714106_640

You don’t need to use much ginger to reap its benefits.  Whenever possible opt for fresh over the dried spice.  The fresh ginger will contain higher levels of gingerol.  Most supermarkets carry the mature ginger which will have the skin that you need to peel. Young ginger is more often found in Asian markets and this ginger skin does not need to be peeled.  Fresh ginger can be stored in your fridge for up to 3 weeks if left unpeeled.  You can also store it in your freezer unpeeled for up to 6 months. 

For cooking, if added in the beginning of the cooking process, it will add a subtle flavor while adding it at the end of cooking will lend the dish a more pungent taste. 

  • For nausea: make ginger tea by steeping 1 or 2 ½ inch slices of ginger in a cup of hot water.
  • For arthritis: ¼ an inch (or more) cooked in food. (The more you use the quicker your relief may be)
  • Add it to rice dishes
  • Mix ginger with coconut aminos and garlic to make a sauce for stir fry
  • Add ginger to your oil and vinegar salad dressing
  • Add it to sautéed vegetable dishes.
  • Mince a teaspoon and add to your regular tea
  • Add to marinades, stews and soups
  • Add some to your morning smoothie
  • You can add in ginger supplementation in capsule form or in tincture form.

When to Use Caution

  • Don’t give to children under 2 years of age.
  • If you have a sensitive stomach, take ginger with some food in your belly.
  • In adults, do not take more than 4 grams per day
  • Pregnant women should only consume up to 1 gram per day.
  • Avoid ginger supplementation if you are on blood thinner
  • If you are on diabetic meds, ginger can reduce blood sugar levels.
  • If you are on blood pressure meds, it can reduce your blood pressure.
  • Always talk to your doctor if adding ginger in as a supplement to your diet since some meds can interact with herbs.

Food for Thought: 

From reading some of the cautions above, it makes me wonder, wouldn’t it be better to use herbs to say lower blood pressure or blood sugar instead of a med that comes with side effects? What do you think?

 

Sources

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage/php?tname=foodspice&dbid=72

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/ginger

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK927775

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3665023/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15630214

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3016669/#!po=67.6471

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/ibuprofen-kills-more-so-what-alternatives

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813412

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4277626/

Balch, P. ( 2012)   Prescription for Herbal Healing.  2nd Edition.  NY: Avery Publishing

Gaby, A.(2006) The Natural Pharmacy. Revised and updated 3rd edition.  NY: Three Rivers Press

Hoffman, D. Medical Herbalism. (2003) The science and practice of herbal medicine.  VT: Healing Arts   

   Press.

Mars, B. (2007) The Desktop Guide to Herbal Medicine.  CA: Basic Health Publications

Skenderi, G. (2003) Herbal Vade Mecum. NJ: Herbacy Press

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

Stop the Mental Health Madness in our Youth: Here is How

Stop the Mental Health Madness in Our Youth

Here is How You Can Help Your Child

Our children are getting diagnosed earlier and more often with mental health issues and some are placed on medication for these disorders as early as three years of age.  What are we missing?

boy looking out train window

Could Nutrition Education Help One’s Emotional State?

slicing pepper for cooking

The answer is YES!   A study called SMILES which was done over the course of 12 weeks in Australia found that those who received 7 hours of nutrition education had improved mood while those who received social support did not have significant improvements. These people had to meet the criteria for a major depressive disorder and had to meet the criteria for a nutrient deficient diet such as one of mostly processed foods. They did not provide a diet to follow and did not advise them to go gluten free or dairy free but rather educated them on the importance of whole foods.  (sources: https://www.madinamerica.com/2017/02/smiles-study-depression-nutrition/  and Jacka; FN, et. al. A randomized controlled trial of dietary improvement for adults with major depression (The SMILES trial). BMC Med. 2017 Jan. 30;15(1);23)

This study shows us great hope and promise just by changing the diet. But this study also raises some questions-what about targeted and individualized nutrition-do some need to avoid certain food groups, do some need extra nutrients and should some address gut health and so forth?  Would their results have been even greater with targeted/individualized nutrition addressing root causes?

The Plan

food-journal-menu

I have created a plan below that targets the mental health of your adolescent or teen.  If you want to help your child but don’t know where to go to get the holistic help you want and don’t know what to do-scroll below for plan options so that your child can get the nutritional and holistic support he or she needs. 

I have plans to make this as easy as possible for you and your child.

Not only am I a holistic nutrition and herb professional (along with an MSW) but prior to my career change I was a mother with a teen with a mood disorder.  I have been where you are and I want to help you.

We can do this together to get your child feeling better. 

  • Are you exhausted and depressed just by seeing your child struggle and suffer?
  • Are you stressed and don’t know what to do to help him or her?
  • Do you feel like you have tried everything and seen every doctor out there?
  • Are you worried about the future of your child?
  • Are you tired of meeting with teachers and counselors and getting calls from school?
  • Is every day an effort just to get through?
  • Do you feel hopeless and don’t know what else to do to help your child?

Scroll down for The Stop the Madness plan

What Does This Mean for You?

If you or a family member is struggling with a mood issue, this is great news.  Just by improving one’s diet, mood issues can decrease. 

As a nutrition professional who specializes in nutrition for mental health, this means you can get the education you need.  Did you know that “Nutrition Education” for a health issue can be applied to your flexible spending account as well?

But what do you then do with all that education? Don’t know where to start? 

Is It Still Too Overwhelming?

stressed person

If you have an adolescent or teen struggling with a mental health issue and you don’t know where to begin, I am here to tell you that it can be much easier than you think is possible. I have been where you are and I have learned a great deal along the way. 

When my son went through severe depression, it was overwhelming to say the least-everything from a complete overhaul of our diet, removing foods, adding in supplements and ripping apart my pantry.  It was a lot or work I admit, but that is why I want to break it down and make it simple for you.

 I took a leave of absence from work during that time and spent hours’ day after day doing research-most of us cannot do that so I am here to help you!  I can show you what to do or I can also do a lot of the work for you-you decide! 

If you are trying to help your family member, they don’t have to attend sessions. I’m sure your youth or teen has been dragged to so many appointments-they don’t need to go to one more.   I can guide and assist you to make this as easy and simple as possible.  Nutrient dense meals and adding in targeted supplements and herbs into meals can be done.  They don’t have to swallow a bunch of pills or live on greens all day long. 

I can guide you every step of the way from laying out a step by step plan, to showing you how to cook simple, nutritious meals to making over your pantry and knowing what to look for in the grocery store. 

Your family member’s mental health state can improve and you can do this using natural ingredients. 

Are you exhausted and stressed by this situation going on in your home? If so, see if a plan below fits your needs. 

 Stop the Madness Plan

person sunset background

If you want to feel better or want to see your child not suffer any longer than view my plans below to get results.  Call me with any questions or to sign up. 303-522-0381

 

Option 1: For local Castle Rock , CO Area families

  • Initial assessment
  • One follow up consult
  • One cooking workshop
  • One pantry makeover
  • One grocery store outing
  • One plan of action-step by step guide (including a 5 -day sample menu plan)
  • List of targeted supplements and herbs with dosing and suggestions
  • Informational/educational handouts specific to your child’s needs
  • Recipes provided
  • 2 email follow-ups included

Option 2: For Distant Clients

  • Initial assessment (can be phone or skype)
  • 2 follow up consults
  • One plan of action -step by step guide (including a 5-day sample menu plan)
  • List of targeted supplements and herbs with dosing and suggestions
  • Informational/educational handouts specific to your child’s needs
  • Guide for cleaning out your pantry and what to replace
  • Recipes
  • 2 emails follow-ups included

Option 3: For local clients

If you feel like you cannot do this alone or don’t have the time on your plate, call me and we can discuss options such as in your home cooking, shopping and pantry clean out assistance and in home consults.  I want to make this as easy as possible for you. 

Option 4: For local and Distant Clients

Nutrition education only-hourly rate. 

 

What is the best option for you?

Call me to discuss and I can guide you to the best option for you and your family.  Pricing discussed during this free initial phone consult. 303-522-0381

 

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

7 Reasons to Add this Booster Food into your Diet: Nutritional Yeast

Why You Should Add this Booster Food to your Daily Meals: Nutritional Yeast

By Karen Brennan, MSW, NC, BCHN®, Herbalist

Nutritional Yeast: What is it?

nutritional yeast in bowl

 

It is not a plant nor animal food but rather a fungus like mushrooms.  It is a good addition to a vegan, vegetarian, paleo, gluten free and dairy free diet. 

I have Candida, I am avoiding foods that contain yeast, can I eat nutritional yeast?

The yeast you find in breads and beer is a live and active yeast.  Nutritional yeast comes in a dried flake form and is not an active yeast.  This means you cannot use it to make bread or beer but more importantly it will not lead to overgrowth of yeast/candida in the body.  Therefore, because it has been deactivated it cannot cause or contribute to candida. You may read otherwise on the web but nutritional yeast is safe to it. 

What causes overgrowth of candida (healthy people will always have some candida) is a diet high in sugary/processed foods and drinks, antibiotic use and birth control pills to name a few root causes.  To learn more about what candida is, what are more causes, symptoms and more importantly, how to address it read this article

What are the Benefits of Adding this Food into my Diet?

  • Beta Glucan fibers found in nutritional yeast help to maintain the body’s defense against pathogens (this was found in a study in which participants consumed a spoonful daily)
  • Another study in which participants consumed one half a spoonful found that mood states improved and they had significant boost in feelings of vigor.
  • It is a great addition to vegan and vegetarian diets due to its protein and B vitamin content. It also has a cheesy taste so many use it to replace cheese in their diet. 
  • It contains all nine essential amino acids.
  • It is a rich source of 14 minerals and 17 vitamins
  • It has antiviral and antibacterial properties
  • It may be useful for candida, chronic acne, diarrhea, and immune system support.
  • Athletes use it for an energy boost

How Do I use it in My Recipes?

zucchini pasta tomato nutrtional yeast

You can add nutritional yeast to many dishes that you make.  Add it at the end to hot and cooked dishes as high temperatures may destroy the nutritional benefits of the yeast.  For instance, add some to your cooked chicken curry dish or to your favorite pasta sauce. 

  • Sprinkle it on your stove topped cooked popcorn
  • Add it into hummus, pesto, pasta sauces and cold soups
  • Sprinkle onto your salads and cooked vegetables
  • Use it as you would use grated cheese
  • Add to bean and rice or whole grain dishes.

Recipes with Nutritional Yeast

Will my local Grocery Store Carry Nutritional Yeast?

  • Your local traditional grocery store may not but many are adding healthier options. For instance, many Wal Marts and King Soopers now contain nutritional yeast products. Whole Foods and other local natural grocery stores and vitamin shops should carry nutritional yeast. 
  • Otherwise order online from www.thrivemarket.com, amazon or many other healthy whole foods or vitamin websites.
  • Because I only use a small amount per day I store mine in a glass jar in the fridge to maintain freshness. Otherwise, store in your pantry or cupboard. It should keep for up to 2 years. 

What You Need to Know

  • Those with Gout may want to keep the amount to ½ a teaspoon per day due to its purine content
  • You may have heard that some nutritional yeast products contain lead. These brands have no detectable lead in them-Bob’s Red Mill, NOW, Bragg’s, Dr. Fuhrman, and Red Star.  However, no matter what the brand, it is safe to consume 2 tablespoons per day. 
  • Some nutritional yeast products contain B12 while others do not. Read the label. If you are a vegan or vegetarian and avoid meats, it is still best to supplement with B12 in a methylated form. It is a myth that B12 is naturally found in nutritional yeast-it must be added in. 
  • It does NOT contain MSG as you may hear this rumor. Yeast is a natural source of the umami flavor or natural glutamic acid.  The glutamic acid is bound to other amino acids. The glutamic acid that is MSG is not bound.  When you consume glutamic acid from real foods, your body controls how much is absorbed.  Excess glutamic acid is passed off as waste not stored in your body.  MSG that is added to fast food and processed foods is an excitotoxin that overexcites your cells. 

 

Sources

http://nutritionfacts.org/2017/02/14/benefits-of-nutritional-yeast-to-prevent-the-common-cold/?

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/04/04/nutritional-yeast-aspx

Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Foundations in Nutrition.  CA: Bauman College

Wood, R. (2010) The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia.  NY: Penguin Books

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

Millet and Cauliflower Mash

Cauliflower Mash with Millet

By Karen Brennan, MSW, NC, BCHN ®, Herbalist

While many think of millet as a grain it is actually a seed.  For that reason, I wonder if it should be included in the paleo diet plan.  This is a twist on cauliflower rice. This recipe was also very simple and quick to make. 

millet cauliflower mash

Ingredients (serves 3-4)

  • 1 T. avocado oil
  • 1 c. diced onion
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 1 t. sea salt
  • 1 c millet
  • ½ of a head of cauliflower, chopped (I used an entire small head of cauliflower)
  • 2 ½ cups chicken broth or bone broth (more on hand as needed) I added about another 1/2 cup. 
  • 1 T. nutritional yeast (optional but a good protein and B vitamin boost)
  • Dash pepper/salt
  • ¼ c. chopped fresh cilantro (or parsley)

Directions

  1. In a large pot over medium high heat, warm the avocado oil and sauté the onion and garlic with the salt for about 5 minutes
  2. Add in the millet, cauliflower, broth and dash salt. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Then reduce the heat to medium and simmer for about 40 minutes stirring regularly and until the millet is cooked through and the liquid has been absorbed.  This should have a creamy consistency.  Add more broth if needed
  3. Use a potato masher to break up any of the cauliflower as need. At this point you can leave out the nutritional yeast or add it in and add salt and pepper to your taste. 
  4. Add the cilantro and serve.

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

Millet Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie

Millet Chocolate Chip Cookies with Peanut Butter

By Karen Brennan, MSW, NC, Herbalist, BCHN ®

A sweet treat to have on occasion that is gluten free but also does not contain brown rice flour.  Many GF products contain brown rice flour which is high in arsenic so it is best to limit the amount of brown rice and brown rice flour if eating a GF diet.  See my article on the benefits of millet http://trufoodsnutrition.com/10-reasons-why-you-should-add-this-grain-seed-into-your-diet/

millet cookie above

Ingredients

  • ½ c. coconut sugar
  • ½ c. organic brown sugar
  • 1 c. peanut butter (or try with almond butter)
  • ½ c. grass fed butter softened (or if DF use spectrum)
  • 1 pasture raised egg
  • 1 /2 T. pure vanilla extract
  • ¾ c. millet flour
  • ¼ c. arrow root starch
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum
  • Dash sea salt
    • 1 c. dark chocolate chips (I like Lily’s or Enjoy Life chocolate chip brands)

millet cookie dough

Directions

  1. Cream the butter with the sugars and the peanut butter. Add the egg and blend
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, starch, baking soda and powder and salt
  3. Add the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and combine well
  4. Add in the dark chocolate.
  5. Wrap the dough in parchment paper and chill in fridge for at least 30 minutes
  6. Place dough on parchment lined cookie tray and bake for 12 minutes at 350 degrees F.

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

10 Reasons Why you Should Add this Grain (Seed) into your Diet

Millet:  10 Reasons to Add this “Grain” to your Diet

By Karen Brennan, MSW, NC, Herbalist, BCHN ®

millet grain

 

What is Millet?

It is a gluten free grain that is tiny in size and round and may be white, gray, yellow or red.  Technically millet is a seed not a grain but it is categorized with grains from a culinary perspective.  It is thought to have originated in North Africa and has been consumed since prehistoric times. 

What are the Benefits to Eating Millet?

  • Heart protective: The magnesium and fiber content is what makes this such as heart healthy grain. Since it also contains potassium it can aid in reducing high blood pressure. 
  • Lowers your cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes risk: Adding WHOLE grains (not processed grains) such as millet into your diet has been shown to lower your risk for certain cancers and heart disease and reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes.
  • Fiber content: Millet contains insoluble fiber which can help prevent gallstones. The fiber content is also protective against breast cancer.  Eating fiber rich grains also lowers the incidence of colon cancer.  Fiber in millet is ideal for lowering your LDL (your “bad” cholesterol).
  • Protective against childhood asthma: This is also due to the magnesium content. Studies have shown that children consuming a diet of whole grains (and fish) have lower incidence of asthma. 
  • Nutrient Dense: Millet is a good source of protein, copper, manganese, phosphorus, B vitamins and magnesium. One cup of cooked millet contains 6 protein grams, 41 carb grams 2.26 fiber grams, 1.74 fat grams and 207 calories. Of all the cereal grains, millet has the richest amino acid profile and the highest iron content. 
  • The magnesium content is also beneficial for migraines and high blood pressure
  • Contains plant lignans: These are converted by healthy gut flora in our intestines into mammalian lignans which is thought to protect against breast cancer and other hormone related cancers and heart disease.  
  • Can improve digestive health: Because of its fiber content, millet can aid with elimination and constipation as well as excess gas, bloating and cramping. It is the easiest of all the grains to digest due to its high alkaline ash content. 
  • Can aid with detoxification: Millet is rich in antioxidants which are beneficial in neutralizing free radicals.
  • Helps to fight fatigue: It is considered among the top foods to eat to fight fatigue due to its B vitamin, iron and macro nutrient content.

 

 

How Do I Cook with Millet?

Basic cooking method

  • Before you use your millet grain you should rinse it under running water to remove any remaining left over dirt and debris.
  • After rinsing, you can cook it as one part millet to two parts liquid such as water or broth. After it boils, reduce the heat to low and cover and simmer for roughly 25 minutes.  The texture cooked this way will be fluffy like rice. If you want a creamier millet, then stir it frequently and add a little more water to it every now and then. 
  • If you want a nuttier flavor, then you can roast the grains prior to boiling. Place the grains in a dry skillet over medium heat and stir frequently. When the millet has a golden color then remove from the skillet and add to the water. 

Simple Serving Suggestions

  • Use as you would quinoa to make a grain/veggie/protein bowl. Add raw or cooked vegetables (use left- over veggies from last night’s dinner) and add a protein such as tempeh, chicken or fish.  Toss it with a homemade dressing and you have a simple meal to take to work for lunch!
  • Use with your meal instead of potatoes or rice as your starch
  • Use ground millet in bread and muffin recipes
  • Add cooked millet to your soups
  • Combine cooked millet with chopped vegetables, GF bread crumbs, eggs and seasonings. Form into patties and bake at 350 degrees F. until done. 

Buying and Storing your Millet

millet stalks

  • When not using your millet, store it in your pantry, in a cool and dark place and it will keep for several months.
  • You can also store it in your refrigerator. (I store mine in a mason jar in the fridge)
  • If your millet has a harsh aftertaste, this means it is rancid and you should discard it.
  • It’s shelf life is not as stable as some other grains so do not purchase this one in bulk.
  • I recommend purchasing your millet from small companies. In CO you can purchase your millet from CJ Milling www.cjmilling.com.  If you don’t have a local source then opt to purchase millet from the refrigerator section of your natural grocery store.

How Do I use Millet Flour?

  • Millet flour has a distinct sweet flavor. Purchase in small amounts since it can turn bitter rapidly. If you purchase from a small local company, ask how fresh the flour is.   You can also grind your own millet into flour in a high- power blender.  Store the flour in the freezer to maintain freshness. 

What Else Should I know about Millet?

  • Millet contains goitrogen, which is a substance that can interfere with thyroid hormone manufacture. Thus, if you have a thyroid issue, just don’t eat millet every day. But still feel free to consume it in moderation.
  • Although it is a gluten free grain/seed, those with celiac disease should start off with a small amount to see if they tolerate it. This is because millet does contain prolamines that are similar to the alpha-gliadin of wheat.  That being said, millet is usually well tolerated by those with celiac disease. 
  • Millet is a GMO free grain and is not sprayed according to  Jennifer at CJ Milling in CO.  She stated that millet is a very safe grain to grow even conventionally since it is not a GMO nor sprayed crop.  You may see organic millet in your store-this is where you save your money and buy this grain/seed non organic. 

 

 

Sources

Murray, M. (2005) The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods.  NY: Atria Books

Rogers, J. (1991) The Healing Foods Cookbook.  PA: Rodale Press.

Wood, R. (2010)  The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia.  NY: Penguin Press

http://www.Whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=53

 

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need.  Call today at 303-522-0381

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today!

 

 

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page

Top 3 Foods to Eat Every Day

3 Foods You Should Eat Every Day and Reasons Why

 

Cruciferous Vegetables

broccoli-sprouts

 

  • This includes broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, broccoli sprouts, kale, bok choy,
  • These vegetables contain sulforaphane which is known for its anti-cancer properties.
  • Sulforaphane may have anti-depressant and anti-anxiety properties
  • This compound in cruciferous vegetables may also reduce inflammation and pain associated with chronic health conditions such as fibromyalgia.
  • Sulforaphane is shown to be cardio protective
  • These vegetables are rich in antioxidants
  • We are exposed to toxins daily and these vegetables can aid in the body’s natural detox process.
  • Try to add in a mix of raw and cooked cruciferous vegetable into your daily diet

Green Leafy Vegetables

salad picture

  • This group includes foods such as spinach, Swiss chard, collard greens, mustard greens, red and green leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce and kale, (some leafy greens also fall into the cruciferous list)
  • They are a rich source of beta carotene which can be converted into vitamin A and can also improve immune function.
  • They have been shown to influence intestinal health- these studies were done in lab animals and more research is needed, however preliminary findings are exciting. (if you read my other posts, you know by now that gut health plays a large role in our immune health and our mental health as well)
  • Low in calories, but rich in fiber, folate, and magnesium
  • They can aid in reducing your risk of cancer and heart disease and should be added in for those with type 2 diabetes. 
  • They are rich in antioxidants which are brain protective
  • Consuming your greens raw will give your body the enzyme boost it needs.  Raw foods have the most active and alive enzymes and we need enzymes to breakdown and digest our food and get the nutrients from those foods. 
  • Add to a salad or a green smoothie to make it simple, or sauté some greens to serve with eggs or mix them into a frittata

Herbs and Spices

herbs to plant pic

  • Unfortunately, in the US many people still are unaware of the value of plants as medicine. In Europe and Asia herbs tend to be more appreciated for their therapeutic properties. 
  • Herbs are the leaves of herbaceous plants.
  • Spices may be the bark, root, bud, fruit or berry of a plant
  • Get past the salt and pepper and add a variety of spices into your daily diet
  • While each spice and herb may have its own unique benefits, the point is that by adding in even small amounts daily can impact your health.
  • If you are unsure how to use spices, start with pre-made spice blends.
  • To save money, buy spices in bulk or start your own herb garden
  • Fresh herbs will tend to add a more delicate flavor to foods than dried herbs. When substituting dried herbs for fresh use 1 teaspoon dried for 1 tablespoon fresh. 
  • Unless it says it is organic, assume it has been irradiated or sterilized per FDA ruling. An organic herb or spice will use a flash-freeze or steam process to sterilize as opposed to using fumigants. 
  • Drink a variety of herbal tea blends.

Bottom Line

By adding in a salad, a vegetable to your meal and/or snack and adding spices to your meals you should be able to reap the health benefits of these foods.  Don’t eat the same green, veggie and herb every day-mix it up and add variety into your diet to reap all the benefits these foods have to offer. 

Sources

Murray, et. al. (2005) The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods. NY: Atria Books

Wood, R. ( 2010) The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia.  NY: Penguin Books

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=btnews&dbid=126

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blogs/top-10-reasons-eat-your-cruciferous-veggies

http://www.babraham.ac.uk/news/2011/10/green-vegetables-directly-influence-immune-defences-and-help-maintain-intestinal-health

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Herbalist

Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition®

Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC

www.trufoodsnutrition.com

303-522-0381

Share this:Share on YummlyShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on VKShare on RedditEmail this to someonePrint this page