H2 Histamine Blockers Concerns and Deficiencies

Ranitidine: An H2 Histamine Blocker

(common name Zantac, Pepcid)

What You Need to Know First

pills

 

Ranitidine is a member of the H-2 histamine blocker family of drugs. This medicine prevents the release of acid into the stomach.  It is used to treat stomach ulcers, GERD, erosive esophagitis, and Zollinger-Ellsion syndrome. 

This is available OTC and as a prescription medication. 

While proton pump inhibitor drugs (PPI’s) have been in the news more lately due to new side effect findings, it does not mean that Histamine blockers are free of concerns. They are both used to suppress gastric secretions but they different in how they do this. 

While these drugs are used to suppress stomach acid, be aware that we need stomach acid.  An easy to read and informative book that I suggest you get to understand why stomach acid is vital to our overall health is “Why we need stomach acid” by Wright and Lenard. 

What H-2 Histamine Blockers May Deplete

  • Folate: Folate is needed by the body to utilize vitamin B12. Zantac and similar medications inhibit folate absorption.  Thus, taking this medication may cause a deficiency in folate and B12
  • Iron: Stomach acid may facilitate iron absorption. Beta blockers reduce stomach acid and are associated with decreased dietary absorption of iron.  People with ulcers may be deficient due to blood loss.  It is best to check iron levels on your blood work. 
  • B12: Stomach acid is needed to release B12 from food so that it can be absorbed by the body. Since beta blockers reduce stomach acid, your B12 levels will also be low.  B12 supplementation does not need stomach acid.
  • Magnesium: These drugs can block the active transport of magnesium in the intestines causing low magnesium and resulting in depression.
  • Other possible nutrient deficiencies include: vitamin A, vitamin D, calcium and zinc

What you Should ask Yourself Before Taking an H-2 Histamine Blocker (or a PPI)

  • These drugs reduce stomach acid. Do you know that elevated stomach acid is your issue?  For some it could be something else and low stomach acid can cause the same symptoms as high stomach acid. 
  • These drugs are meant to be taken only short term, 4-8 weeks, but most people take these meds long term, sometimes for years. Would you rather get to the root of your problem and address it?
  • Would life style and dietary changes be better (and safer with no side effects) be better than taking a drug?

What May Be Causing Your Stomach Issues

  • Hiatal Hernia
  • Hormones (yours and those from your food)
  • Eating too much, too quickly and too late
  • Relaxation of the esophageal sphincter
  • High or low stomach acid
  • Coffee, caffeine, carbonated drink, spicy foods
  • Gall bladder issues (which can also mean liver issues since bile is made in the liver and is stored in the gallbladder)

Natural Options

ginger-1714106_640

It is always best to work with a professional to address your root causes and find out what would be the best method of body balance and digestive relief but here are a few things you can try on your own in the meantime. 

  • Try drinking 1 tablespoon of Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar in 8 ounces of water before a meal. If this helps, you may have low stomach acid. If it makes it worse, try ½ teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of water. If this resolves your issue, you may have high stomach acid.

o   If you have high stomach acid limit the amount of spicy foods you eat during gut healing (which includes coffee). 

o   As we age our stomach acid levels go down, thus older people tend to have low not high stomach acid. 

  • Add in digestive bitters before a meal. Bitter foods and herbs stimulate our bile and digestive juices to aid with meal digestion. 
  • Add in a digestive enzyme, a full spectrum one is best, so that is has the needed enzymes to break down your fats, sugar (carbs/starches), and proteins in the meal.
  • Chew DGL (licorice) before a meal
  • CHEW! Don’t inhale your food. Chew each bite 15-20 times.  This aids the digestive process.  It may seem simple but just this step alone can be very effective for some. 
  • Work with someone to determine if you have food intolerances. Or start by removing a food group for 2 to 4 weeks and see if the issue resolves. The main culprits include gluten, dairy, soy and corn.  

Bottom Line

Ask yourself if you want to address the cause or use symptom management. The choice is yours. 

Sources

  1. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/suzy-cohen-rph/acid-reflux-medication-_b_2522466.html
  2. Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Foundations in Nutrition. CA: Bauman College
  3. Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Therapeutics in Nutrition. CA: Bauman College
  4. Gaby, A. (2006) A-Z Guide to Drug-Herb-Vitamin Interactions. NY: Three Rivers Press
  5. Wright, J. & Lenard, L. (2001) Why Stomach Acid is Good For You. NY: M. Evanns

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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Digestive Issues and How to Tell if it is an Issue with Casein or Lactose

Is Casein Or lactose Causing Your Digestive Problems?

milk

Many people assume that if they experience gas or bloating and pain after consuming dairy that they are lactose intolerant. This may not always be the case.  This can occur for other reasons as well. 

A lactose intolerance usually affects just the digestive system while a casein sensitivity can have an impact in other areas of health as well. 

How to Know if you are Lactose Intolerant

If you are lactose intolerant, this means that you lack the enzyme, lactase, to break down the sugar, lactose in your dairy products. 

  • Signs and symptoms typically occur about 30 minutes after ingesting the food containing dairy. (but can occur up to 2 hours later)
  • You may experience gas, bloating, loose bowels, sinus congestion, cramps and nausea.
  • Typically, those who are lactose intolerant can still eat most cheeses and not experience symptoms. This is because in the process of making cheese, lactose is converted into lactic acid which is easy to digest. 
  • Cream, butter and yogurt have little to no lactose (full fat heavy whipping cream has none) so these are still okay for those with lactose intolerance. Heavy whipping cream also does not contain casein.
  • Skim milk does contain lactose.
  • Fermented dairy such as kefir has less lactose so you may be able to tolerate it.
  • Even if you are lactose intolerant you may be able to digest small amounts in a single meal.
  • Yogurt contains less lactose than milk.
  • Raw cheese has only small amounts of lactose and casein.

Pay attention to which dairy foods give you trouble.  Is it just milk?  Is it only when you consume large amount of dairy?  This may help you to figure out if your issue is with lactose.  If it is an issue with lactose then taking a digestive enzyme that contains lactase 30 minutes prior to the meal may help, along with consuming smaller amount of dairy at your meals or eliminating it from your diet (you don’t need dairy to meet your calcium needs-see more information below). 

The brand of digestive enzyme I like is Enzymedica. 

Which Cheeses have less lactose?

cheese

If you aren’t ready to give up dairy, here are some cheeses you can still eat if you are lactose intolerant

  • The fresher the cheese the more lactose it will have; aged cheeses are a better choice.
  • You want to opt for cheeses that have less than 3% lactose range. (whole milk has 3.7-4.8%)
  • Muenster, camembert, brie, cheddar, provolone, gouda, blue, parmesan and swiss are all good choices.
  • AVOID: Feta, ricotta, Colby, American and Velveeta (why would you eat these last two processed cheeses anyway?).
  • Opt for organic, raw and grass fed cheeses if you can. (see below for more information as to why)

Signs It May Be the Casein and Not the lactose in your Dairy

Casein is the main protein in dairy and is also added to other foods used as a binding agent.  Casein is found in milk and in lactose free dairy products.  So, if you consume lactose free products and still experience symptoms it may be the casein and not lactose that is causing your issues. 

In addition to gut and digestive symptoms, a casein sensitivity has been linked to ADHD, autism, brain fog, asthma, aggression, anger and excess mucus production.  It can also cause headaches, ear infections, eczema and skin allergies. 

Ask yourself, in addition to your digestive issues are you suffering from any of the issues mentioned above?  If so, it may be the protein in the dairy.  If you are still unsure you may want to do food allergy testing.  Tests range from stool samples to blood tests.  Butter contains very little casein and heavy cream does not contain casein.  The dairy foods that have the most protein will contain more casein. 

If it is casein and not lactose that is an issue for you, removing casein from the diet is a good first step.  However, if you have been reacting to it for a long time there may be other issues that will need to be addressed such as possible intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation. 

What You Need to Know About Your Dairy

milk jug and glass

Pasteurization is a process that heats the milk to kill off bacteria, microbes and pathogens.  However, the process also kills off the good bugs.  It also destroys enzymes that are needed to break down fats, and proteins and to deliver vitamins and minerals. 

Ultra- Pasteurized milk is heated to 275 degrees and destroys everything!  It is best to avoid this type of milk. 

Pasteurized milk is heated to 160 degrees and preserves some of the good bacteria. 

Vat-Pasteurized is heated to 135 degrees and preserves the good bacteria and many of the enzymes.  This is the best commercial choice.  Organic Valley brand has a whole milk that is vat pasteurized.  Kalona Farms brand offers vat pasteurized products as well which can be found at Whole Foods. 

Opt for organic milk to avoid antibiotics, growth hormones and pesticides that are carried in the fatty portion of the milk.  While I don’t recommend skim milk, if you don’t buy organic this would be your safer bet since it does not contain the fat and thus will not be contaminated with the hormones, antibiotics and pesticides that milk with fat would contain.  But skim milk is also harder to digest and lacks beneficial fats. 

If you consume large amounts of milk, you may want to consider raw milk shares.  Go to realmilk.com to find a local farm.  If you have a casein sensitivity, even raw milk may not be for you.  There is a brand called A2 which many with a casein sensitivity can tolerate. The downside however is that it is not organic.  If you are lactose intolerant you may want to opt for milk alternatives such as nut milks, hemp milk or coconut milk. 

Keep in mind that “You are what your food eats”.  If you consume dairy products from a CAFO (confined animal factory operation), you will be consuming some of the hormones, antibiotics, GMO feed etc. that is given to these cows that may never see the light of day and never leave their confined very small indoor space. 

There are many small local farms that you can support. They may not have the organic label but do follow organic and humane practices.  Visit your local farmers market in the summer and stop and talk to those at the booths to find out how you can get their products year-round. 

Non-Dairy Calcium Sources

Nutrition

Many people still think that the only way to get their calcium is via dairy products.  This is just not true!  There are many non-dairy calcium sources.  And in fact, there are numerous cultures around the world that do not eat dairy and yet still have healthy bone density.  To absorb your calcium, you need adequate amounts of vitamin D3.  Most dairy products are fortified with vitamin D2 which is synthetic and not as easy to absorb and assimilate.  Take a vitamin D3 supplement or get some sunshine if your blood work shows that you are low. 

Non-dairy Calcium Sources

  • Dark leafy greens such as collard greens, spinach and kale
  • Dark green vegetables such as broccoli
  • Legumes
  • Sesame seeds
  • Almonds
  • Canned salmon with bones
  • Sardines
  • Rhubarb
  • Okra
  • Edamame
  • Black eyed peas

Is It Better to Consume Fermented Dairy (kefir) and Goat Dairy?

 

Kefir fermentation breaks down proteins in the dairy and thus those with a casein sensitivity may be able to tolerate kefir.   The kefir microorganisms ferment milk lactose.  Kefir contains a lot of bacteria that aid lactose digestion.  These bacteria may help to digest lactose.  The plus is that kefir also has a broad range of nutrients and due to its probiotic content is supportive for gut an immune health. 

Lifeway kefir states that their kefir is 99% lactose free and this is due to the fermentation process.  The cultures break down the lactose.  Lifeway states that not all kefirs are 99% lactose free so you may want to contact the company before you trying other brands. 

Kefir may be a good option if you cannot tolerate casein or are lactose intolerant.  Better yet, opt for goat milk kefir since goat milk is known to be easier to digest. 

 

Bottom Line: Experiment with various dairy foods to see which you can tolerate and which that you cannot. If you have any mood or skin issues in addition to the digestive issues, it may be best to work a professional to work on gut healing, addressing possible leaky gut and nutrient deficiencies.  A nutrition professional can guide you as to which foods you can safely tolerate.  While Americans love their dairy, it is not a necessary food group to maintain optimum health and in reality, may be causing some of your chronic health issues. 

 

Sources

http://bodyecology.com/articles/2-signs-of-enzyme-deficiency-that-you-can%E2%80%99t-miss

http://www.stevecarper.com/li/list_of_lactose_percentages.htm

http://milkgenomics.org/article/kefir-microorganisms-break-down-milk-proteins/

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/how-consuming-dairy-can-impact-your-mood

www.lifewaykefir.com

www.kefir.net

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2003/03/26/pastuerized-milk-part-one.aspx

http://dontwastethecrumbs.com/2013/10/whats-the-difference-between-all-those-types-of-milk-in-the-grocery-store/

www.safeharbor.com

Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Foundations of Nutrition. CA: Bauman College.

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

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Increase of Arsenic in a Gluten Free Diet

Going Gluten Free

The Increase of Arsenic in a Gluten Free Diet

By Karen Brennan, MSW, NC, BCHN, Herbalist

brown rice

 

You may opt to go gluten free for various health reasons.  Avoiding gluten means avoiding gluten containing grains which are wheat, rye, barley, and spelt (and oats if it does not say gluten free). 

Many people who avoid these grains substitute with gluten free products. While I don’t recommend this substitution due to the still high processed carb and sugar content, there are also other reasons to be concerned.

Are you Getting too Much Arsenic in your Diet by going Gluten Free?

wheat-with x thru it

 

Many gluten free products contain brown rice and or white rice.   It is not so bad if you consume brown/white rice from time to time but if you eat gluten free products daily, chances are, you are consuming a lot rice.

  Some of these products contain 90 times more arsenic than what is allowed in drinking water.  Even low levels of arsenic can contribute to headaches, fatigue, brain fog, digestive issues respiratory illness and more.  Arsenic is found in brown rice at higher concentrations than what is found in white rice. Organic rice will contain arsenic too. 

Rice is grown in flooded fields and it absorbs more arsenic from the environment than any other crop.  Arsenic is a chemical element found naturally in our environment.  It is present in our soil, water and air.  Organic arsenic is used in pesticides and fertilizers.  When used this way, the arsenic can stay in the soil for years after crops are harvested.  For example, much of the rice harvested in the US is grown on former cotton fields where farmers used arsenic based pesticides to control weevils. 

Who Should Watch Their Arsenic Intake

Arsenic can accumulate in your hair, skin, nails and even in your internal organs. 

  • Pregnant women
  • Children and infants
  • People who eat a lot of rice
  • People who are on a gluten free diet

Symptoms of Arsenic Toxicity

(from low level, long term exposure (i.e.: gluten free diet))

This is not an exhaustive list but some of the more common/frequent symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Stomach pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Numbness of hands and feet
  • Higher rates of skin, bladder and lung cancer
  • Increase in heart disease
  • Skin and nail changes
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • headaches

How to Know if You Have High Arsenic Levels

Just because you are on a gluten free diet doesn’t mean you require testing.  This should be determined on an individual basis and is between you and your health care provider. 

On average, there is 10-20 milligrams of arsenic in the average human body.  Exceeding these levels can contribute to health problems.

  • Arsenic 24- hour urine test: this is the preferred test
  • Raid Urine Spot Test: this test is not as accurate
  • Blood Test: this can be used in conjunction with the 24-hour test and do monitor levels
  • Hair Mineral Analysis: You can request this test on your own and have your holistic nutritionist or ND go over the results with you.

How to Reduce Arsenic in Your Diet

 

  • Rice, wine and fruit juices can contain higher arsenic amounts than other foods
  • Organic foods do not necessarily contain less since arsenic is found in the soil
  • Talk to your doctor about giving rice cereal to your infant: consider other foods as your baby’s first food. Babies should have no more than one serving of rice cereal per day.
  • Limit the amount of gluten free products you consume such as gf pizza, bread, pasta and so forth.
  • Alternate your grains: Learn how to cook and bake using other grains such as millet, teff and quinoa
  • Brown rice contains 30-80% more arsenic than white rice. This is because it still contains the bran and germ portion of the kernel which is where most of the arsenic concentrates. 
  • If you do use brown rice opt for basmati as it will contain less arsenic. For white rice, opt for basmati as well, to reduce exposure.
  • Rinse your rice before use. This can reduce 25-30% of the arsenic content.

Bottom Line

Eat a well-balanced diet. You don’t have to eliminate rice products entirely from your diet but instead mix it up with other grains and fruits and vegetables. For instance, if you always eat your burger and sandwich on a gluten free bun, try a lettuce wrap or paleo coconut wraps.  Instead of having rice as a side dish, have quinoa, cauliflower rice, teff or millet.  Instead of brown rice pasta try lentil or quinoa pasta.  There are many options!

Research shows that while chelation may be good to remove heavy metals it may not be as effective to remove arsenic.  Instead a dietary protocol including  mineral supplementation can help to remove arsenic.  Depending on your level of toxicity, it may take up to 2 years to reduce toxic levels. 

 

Recipes

Here are some a couple gluten free recipes that do not contain brown rice/Visit my blog page for many more recipes

 

 

Sources

http://theceliacmd.com/2015/03/arsenic-in-rice-the-gluten-free-diet-facts-and-tips/

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm

http://drlwislon.com/articles/ARSENIC.htm

Haas, E.& Levin, B. (2006) Staying Healthy with Nutrition.  CA: Celestial Arts

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

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“New Year. New You” 12 Tips to Stick with and Achieve your Health Goals this Year

New Year. A New You!

12 Tips for you to Achieve Your Health Goals Finally!

By Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, BCHN, Herbalist

person sunset background

 

“This year I’m going to lose 20 pounds, (or start going to the gym, or improve my blood work numbers, etc.…)

Sound Familiar?  

Why do we stick with it for only a few months, only to go back to our old ways?

 

Bottom Line: We do too much, too fast and go about it haphazardly.  We place a great deal of stress and burden on ourselves to change and to do it right NOW!  Then when you slip a little, say miss a day at the gym, you feel defeated and soon one day “off your diet” turns into one week, then one month….

 

 

Change takes time.  You didn’t get to your health issues overnight.  Be patient. 

Here are 12 tips (one for each month) to get you on track to a healthier lifestyle.  Adding in these tips, one at a time, will make them sustainable and they will become part of your routine.  These basic tips are effective for anyone looking to lose weight, balance blood sugar, improve blood work scores, gain energy, improve sleep and much more. 

 

 

Focus on only one step every 2 to 4 weeks.  Don’t go out of order. They are in this order for a reason. Don’t move on to the next step if you are still adjusting to the one prior to it.   

 

1. Consume 16 ounces of Water First Thing in the Morning:

water

This is very effective for weight loss, increased energy and removing waste from the body.  Do this before you eat.  Make it a habit just like brushing your teeth in the morning.  Many of us are walking around in a dehydrated state and don’t even know it. 

 

2. Add in General Supplementation:

IMG_1586

Diet is important but unfortunately our soil is not a mineral rich as it was 70 years ago; the foods you eat today do not contain the same number of vitamins and minerals that it did pre-WWII era.  Add in at the very least, quality multivitamin, magnesium supplement (I like Natural Calm powder to add to water)

 

3. Focus on WHERE you Eat:

2-people-eating

Many don’t think this is a big deal but it really is a huge deal!  I cannot stress this enough!  Where do you eat? In the car, in front of the TV, at your desk at work, in front of the fridge, while walking, while on the phone or computer? 

 

 

Focus on eating only when sitting down at a table.  And not while working.  Studies show that those who take 20-30 minutes to eat lunch while not working were more productive than those who thought they could get more done if they ate and worked at the same time.  Have you ever been staring at your computer, a meal by your side and then look over and realize the food is gone and wonder who ate your food? You didn’t even realize you consumed it, let alone enjoy your meal.  If you want to improve your health you need to start paying attention to this step!!

 

 4. Add in Fermented Foods:

sauerkraut

 

Save your money and skip the probiotic supplement and instead add in a variety of fermented foods and drinks such as plain goat milk kefir, kombucha, fermented sauerkraut and other fermented vegetables, miso (fermented soy) and tempeh.  Add in one serving per day.

 

 If you have any digestive or bowel issues you may have to start very slow and work your way up to a serving. Some people with a compromised digestive system can only handle a few bites of fermented vegetables per day the first few weeks until their gut health improves. 

 

The benefits of fermented foods is lengthy.  For now, just know that it can aid in weight loss, support your immune health and assist with mood, focus and attention issues and much more. 

 

 5. Focus on Chewing:

This pertains to number 3 as well. Now that you are not eating mindlessly while doing other tasks, now is the time to focus on slow eating.  At first count every now and then how many times you chew each bite of food and look at the time and see how long it takes you to eat a meal. 

 

Are you chewing 3-5 times per bite? Are you inhaling your food?  Are you done eating before everyone else?  Do you feel bloating after every meal or experience indigestion after a meal? Then it’s time to slow down and chew each bite 10-20 times.

 

 It sounds like a lot but the breakdown of each bite of food is important for digestion and assimilation of needed nutrients. It also gives your body time to send the signal to your brain to stop eating and that you are full.  Eating slowly can aid with weight loss, improve digestion, relieve you of gas and bloating and slow down the process of sugar and carbs entering the blood stream. 

 

 6. Swap out Foods that Contain Artificial Sugar:

soda-juice-grocery-aisle

 

Just because you may not drink diet soda, does not mean you do not consume artificial sweetener.  Many products such as frozen meals, protein powders, weight loss products, low fat products, protein bars, yogurt, bottled juice and tea beverages contain artificial sugars (sometime more than one). It is hidden in many places. 

 

Once you read labels you will be shocked to find out how many products contain this fake product.  I get asked often “If I had to choose between sugar and fake sugar which is the best choice?”  While I do not like either in processed form, I would have to say go for the real sugar.  Fake sugar is now linked to diabetes, overeating of more processed carbs and sugary foods and it disrupts the gut microbiome.

 

Swap out diet soda for seltzer water with lemon, the low-calorie yogurt for plain Greek yogurt or plain goat milk yogurt, swap out the protein bar with a different protein bar (there are so many to choose from), and swap out frozen meals for crock pot meals.

 

 7. Think in Colors:

vegetables-fall

 

If you have young children, you can get them involved and make this a fun game.  Pick a color to focus on each day or each week. For instance, focus on eating red fruits, vegetables and spices this day or week.  This could look like sweet potato, red bell peppers, curry powder, cumin powder, paprika, strawberries, pomegranates, radish, apples, red potatoes, tomatoes and so forth.  Have fun with it. 

 

The more color you get into your diet, the better this is for your health.  Each color contains different phytonutrients that are beneficial for your health.  So, if you eat just broccoli and green beans all the time you are missing out of many other plant nutrients by avoiding the rest of the rainbow. 

 

 8. Eat more Protein, less Carbs for Breakfast:

eggs

If you eat a bagel on the run, a muffin at the coffee shop, a bowl of cereal or just a piece of fruit, you are setting yourself up for low blood sugar, cravings, irritability and fatigue for the rest of the day.  Unless you are heading out for a long bout of cardio you don’t need all those carbs in the morning.  Start your day with a moderate amount of protein (i.e.: 2-3 eggs or scoop of protein powder in your green smoothie), add in some quality fats such as a few slices of avocado or handful of nuts/seeds and a small number of carbs such as one half an apple.  

9. Bring lunch to Work Three Times each week:

Do you and your co-workers decide where to order from each day for lunch?  Do you eat out more than 4 times per week?  Besides saving money, you will do your body good to prepare a meal from home and bring to work. Already bring lunch 3 days per week?  Then shoot for five!  This doesn’t have to be complicated. It can be a “Mason Jar Meal”, leftovers, quinoa bowl, salad with protein, etc.

By doing so you will eliminate processed carbs, poor quality proteins and unhealthy fats from your diet on these days.  Trust me, your body will thank you!

 

 10. Make it a Rule: Vegetables or Salad at every Dinner:

salad

While it would be great if we could eat vegetables at every meal and snack, I realize this is not very practical for most. 

 

Make it a goal that at every dinner you have a dark leafy green salad and/or several vegetables.  For instance, if it’s a salad, get creative and see how many different vegetables you can include in it.  For vegetables, roast a medley instead of just one.  

 

 11. One Day Each Week Omit Processed Gluten:

 

While whole grain wheat per se I do not think is evil, what is causing some problems today is the processed wheat and the amount that we consume.  In the past, we did not consume wheat at every meal and snack and it was not refined.

 

Refined grain is stripped of its nutrients, protein and fiber, so all you are left with is the starchy portion which contributes to disrupted blood sugar, cravings, obesity and systemic inflammation. 

 

Ezekiel bread is better because it is not as processed but even this should be limited to one to two pieces per day.  So, the problem is not whole grains (unless you have celiac disease, gluten allergy or gluten sensitivity), the problem is the bread, pasta, bagels, muffins, cereals, etc.… made from refined processed gluten/wheat. 

 

Swap it out for whole grains or alternative flours such as teff, millet, quinoa, basmati white rice, coconut flour, almond flour, tiger nut flour and cassava flour. 

 

 12. One Day Each Week Omit Processed Dairy

 

Pasteurized dairy is typically from cows fed a GMO diet, cows that are given growth hormones and antibiotics.  If you have health issues such as GERD, mood issues, weight issues, bowel issues and so forth, you may want to consider swapping out your milk, yogurt and cheese for fermented dairy such as kefir, raw, organic cheese and goat milk products as some tolerate goat’s milk better than cow’s milk. 

 

For some they don’t notice a difference until they swap out all the dairy products for 2 to 4 weeks.  This is up to you and is based on your health issues and whether you have a casein allergy or are lactose intolerant. 

 

You can try nut milks and coconut milk and coconut yogurt as substitutes as well

 

 Evaluate and see how far you have come in 12 months!

Keep a log and write each one at the beginning of each month on your calendar.  In 12 months see how far you have come.    Congrats!

Don’t forget!

Jan 15th, Sunday 2-3:30 @ Castle Rock, CO Philip S. Miller Library

Start the new year off right and sustain your goals this year!  I will show you how. 

RSVP to trufoodsnutrition@yahoo.com as space is limited.

 

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition (candidate) is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit her site at  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, then like here fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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What is Really Causing your Acid Reflux/GERD and 10 Tips to Make it Stop

Myth: If I have acid reflux/GERD, it must mean I have high stomach acid levels and I need an antacid or a stronger medication to fix it.

person-holding-chest

Wrong: Just because you have acid reflux or GERD does not always mean you have high stomach acid. Yes, you may (rarer than you think) but other times you may have low stomach acid which can also contribute to an issue with your lower esophageal sphincter.

The incidence of heartburn increases with age and yet as you age your stomach acid levels decline.  Dr. Jonathan Wright, in his book, “Why Stomach Acid is good for you” states that in his 24 years of practice that he has found that GERD is more often related to low stomach acid and that elevated stomach acid levels are rare. 

Just because you have acid reflux, don’t assume that it is because you have too much acid. It would seem to make sense but it is not that you may have too much but that the acid that you do have in the esophagus is causing the problem.  The lining of the esophagus isn’t protected like the walls of the stomach is to protect it from the acidic environment. 

The medication may relive the symptom but it does not address the problem. On top of that these medications, research is finding, can cause a host of serious side effects. These include greater risk of heart attack than non-users, increase risk of chronic kidney disease, reduced absorption of vitamins and minerals, increased risk of infection such as c-diff and pneumonia, increase risk of bone fractures, and increase risk of dementia!

 

Bottom line: If you suffer with acid reflux, don’t assume that it is caused by high stomach acid.  In many instances, it can be caused by low stomach acid and this requires a different approach as opposed to medication. Work with a health professional who can guide you in diet, lifestyle, supplements and herbs to use to correct the issue.  If you are on a PPI don’t go off unless under the supervision of your doctor as rebound effects can be severe. 

But Here are some tips:

Pick one or two-no need to try all of them at once!

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  • Take a digestive enzyme about 10 minutes before your meal
  • Take liquid digestive bitters right before a meal. Swish in your mouth before swallowing. Not Swedish bitters but digestive bitters. 
  • Mix some minced ginger root with peppermint leaves to make a tea blend and drink after your meal
  • Try one tablespoon of unfiltered apple cider vinegar (such as Bragg’s Brand) mixed with 4-6 ounces water right before a meal or after if the reflux occurs. 
  • Drink away from your meals not with them-let your digestive juices go to work instead of diluting them. 
  • If it happens every time you eat, consider a food allergy.  Start by removing gluten for 3 weeks before adding it back in.  Pay attention when you do add it back in. If it is the cause then keep it out of your diet.  If that’s not the culprit, move down the line through some common allergens such as corn, soy and dairy. 
  • Chew…eat……bite…. slow down and take your time when you eat. Chew each bite 15 plus times.  Eating too fast can cause acid reflux.
  • Sit upright at the table-I know that sounds strange like you are saying “how else would I sit?” but people eat laying down, walking, slouched on the couch, moving around doing things at work, etc.…none of this is very supportive of digestion
  • Try to relax: take a deep breath and enjoy and appreciate your food and whomever you are eating with. When we eat in a stressed state, everything tightens up and slows down digestion creating issues.
  • And lastly, maybe the hardest one for Thanksgiving: don’t over eat! Eat until you feel about 80% full not so full that you can barely breath or move. 

 

Sources

Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Therapeutic Nutrition.  CA: Bauman College

Montana, C. What Doctors Don’t tell you. Oct. 2016 issue, www.wddty.com

Wright, J. & Lenard, L. (2001) Why Stomach Acid is good for you.  CO: M. Evans

https://chriskresser.com/what-everybody-ought-to-know-but-doesnt-about-heartburn-gerd/

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaeurology/article-abstract/2487379

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition (candidate), author of the  book Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC believes in food first when addressing the root causes to your health conditions.  For more information, visit her website at www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Like her Facebook page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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