H2 Histamine Blockers Concerns and Deficiencies

Ranitidine: An H2 Histamine Blocker

(common name Zantac, Pepcid)

What You Need to Know First

pills

 

Ranitidine is a member of the H-2 histamine blocker family of drugs. This medicine prevents the release of acid into the stomach.  It is used to treat stomach ulcers, GERD, erosive esophagitis, and Zollinger-Ellsion syndrome. 

This is available OTC and as a prescription medication. 

While proton pump inhibitor drugs (PPI’s) have been in the news more lately due to new side effect findings, it does not mean that Histamine blockers are free of concerns. They are both used to suppress gastric secretions but they different in how they do this. 

While these drugs are used to suppress stomach acid, be aware that we need stomach acid.  An easy to read and informative book that I suggest you get to understand why stomach acid is vital to our overall health is “Why we need stomach acid” by Wright and Lenard. 

What H-2 Histamine Blockers May Deplete

  • Folate: Folate is needed by the body to utilize vitamin B12. Zantac and similar medications inhibit folate absorption.  Thus, taking this medication may cause a deficiency in folate and B12
  • Iron: Stomach acid may facilitate iron absorption. Beta blockers reduce stomach acid and are associated with decreased dietary absorption of iron.  People with ulcers may be deficient due to blood loss.  It is best to check iron levels on your blood work. 
  • B12: Stomach acid is needed to release B12 from food so that it can be absorbed by the body. Since beta blockers reduce stomach acid, your B12 levels will also be low.  B12 supplementation does not need stomach acid.
  • Magnesium: These drugs can block the active transport of magnesium in the intestines causing low magnesium and resulting in depression.
  • Other possible nutrient deficiencies include: vitamin A, vitamin D, calcium and zinc

What you Should ask Yourself Before Taking an H-2 Histamine Blocker (or a PPI)

  • These drugs reduce stomach acid. Do you know that elevated stomach acid is your issue?  For some it could be something else and low stomach acid can cause the same symptoms as high stomach acid. 
  • These drugs are meant to be taken only short term, 4-8 weeks, but most people take these meds long term, sometimes for years. Would you rather get to the root of your problem and address it?
  • Would life style and dietary changes be better (and safer with no side effects) be better than taking a drug?

What May Be Causing Your Stomach Issues

  • Hiatal Hernia
  • Hormones (yours and those from your food)
  • Eating too much, too quickly and too late
  • Relaxation of the esophageal sphincter
  • High or low stomach acid
  • Coffee, caffeine, carbonated drink, spicy foods
  • Gall bladder issues (which can also mean liver issues since bile is made in the liver and is stored in the gallbladder)

Natural Options

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It is always best to work with a professional to address your root causes and find out what would be the best method of body balance and digestive relief but here are a few things you can try on your own in the meantime. 

  • Try drinking 1 tablespoon of Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar in 8 ounces of water before a meal. If this helps, you may have low stomach acid. If it makes it worse, try ½ teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of water. If this resolves your issue, you may have high stomach acid.

o   If you have high stomach acid limit the amount of spicy foods you eat during gut healing (which includes coffee). 

o   As we age our stomach acid levels go down, thus older people tend to have low not high stomach acid. 

  • Add in digestive bitters before a meal. Bitter foods and herbs stimulate our bile and digestive juices to aid with meal digestion. 
  • Add in a digestive enzyme, a full spectrum one is best, so that is has the needed enzymes to break down your fats, sugar (carbs/starches), and proteins in the meal.
  • Chew DGL (licorice) before a meal
  • CHEW! Don’t inhale your food. Chew each bite 15-20 times.  This aids the digestive process.  It may seem simple but just this step alone can be very effective for some. 
  • Work with someone to determine if you have food intolerances. Or start by removing a food group for 2 to 4 weeks and see if the issue resolves. The main culprits include gluten, dairy, soy and corn.  

Bottom Line

Ask yourself if you want to address the cause or use symptom management. The choice is yours. 

Sources

  1. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/suzy-cohen-rph/acid-reflux-medication-_b_2522466.html
  2. Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Foundations in Nutrition. CA: Bauman College
  3. Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Therapeutics in Nutrition. CA: Bauman College
  4. Gaby, A. (2006) A-Z Guide to Drug-Herb-Vitamin Interactions. NY: Three Rivers Press
  5. Wright, J. & Lenard, L. (2001) Why Stomach Acid is Good For You. NY: M. Evanns

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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What is Leaky Gut Syndrome and Your Mental Health

What is Leaky Gut Syndrome and Why You Should Know About it

gut

This is a buzz word lately along with gut health and the microbiome. Why is this such as big deal?  Should you even be concerned, especially if you do not have any stomach digestive issues? 

The answer is yes, you should know how your gut health impacts many aspects of your health, not just physical but your mental health as well. It is a very common health issue today yet many people are unaware of it and traditional medical professionals do not address it typically, most likely because they have never been taught about it in medical school

What is Leaky Gut Syndrome? (LGS)

Leaky gut syndrome (LGS) and intestinal permeability mean the same thing.  When you have LGS, food particles that should normally be broken down into their parts (usually these are proteins) are instead passed through the gut lining in their unbroken down state.  They then travel through the blood stream and can wreak havoc in your body. While there they trigger an over stimulation of the immune system and allergic reactions. 

In a healthy gut, you would have tight junctions along the gut wall so that food gets digested and absorbed via the normal digestion process.  This gut lining can become inflamed (for many reasons-see list below) and these tight junctions can separate creating holes in this protective barrier.  The toxins are now passing through these tears in the intestinal wall.  Once they enter the blood stream they can trigger an immune response which is protective rather than a healing response. 

Think of LGS as intruders invading your home.  If the door stays open (LGS) the intruders will constantly enter with nothing to stop them. Thus, if your root causes for LGS are not addressed, that door will continue to stay open and more damage will be done to your home.  Over time then the issue become chronic. 

Once the issue becomes chronic, it places stress upon the liver. The liver attempts to clean up this toxic overload but the liver may now be overburdened and cannot keep up.  This burden will lead to even more consequences over time. 

Over time this leads to low grade infections within the body and can affect your gut health but can also affect your brain and your liver.  It can contribute to autoimmune disease, autism and allergies. It has been linked to MS, chronic fatigue syndrome, acne, eczema, psoriasis, and IBS to name a few. 

LGS Symptoms

  • Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation
  • ADHD
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Autism
  • Bipolar
  • GERD
  • Poor immune functioning (get every cold that comes around or take a long time to recover form illness)
  • Brain fog, memory loss
  • Headaches
  • Excessive fatigue
  • Nutritional deficiencies (not absorbing your nutrients)
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Skin issues (eczema, psoriasis, acne)
  • IBS
  • IBD
  • Other autoimmune conditions such as Hashimotos, celiac disease, fibromyalgia
  • Arthritis, inflamed joints, chronic pain
  • Changes in mood, weight, and appetite

What to Do if Have a Leaky Gut

The first thing to do if you know you have leaky gut is to identify what is causing it.

 Some causes of leaky gut include (not an exhaustible list):

GMO

  • NSAIDS
  • Anorexia
  • Candida
  • Old age
  • Alcohol abuse
  • Chemo and radiation
  • Parasitic infection
  • GMO’s, pesticides, herbicides, glyphosate
  • Antibiotic use
  • Food allergies/food sensitivities
  • Standard American Diet
  • Diet high in refined sugar and processed, refined carbs
  • Gluten (today’s gluten is sprayed)
  • Pasteurized dairy
  • Meats from CAFO (confined animal factory operations)
  • Chronic elevated cortisol levels

 

 

When you Have Identified your Causes (often there is more than one) Then Follow a Step by Step Protocol:

  1. Remove the identifying causes from your diet (if you need to, work with a nutritional professional who can help you identify your root causes and possibly order testing such as IgG food allergy testing, Stool testing, Organic Acid tests, zonulin or lactulose tests ). I
  2. Add in supportive foods for your body, such as leafy greens, fruits, vegetables, quality fats and proteins. Eat whole foods as much as possible. Hydrate with filtered water and organic herbal teas. 
  3. Add in herbs and supportive supplements to promote gut healing and liver detox (it is best to work under the guidance of a professional at this point as some herbs and supplements can interact with meds or may not be suitable for some health conditions)
  4. Add in prebiotic and probiotic rich foods such as kefir, kimchi, fermented vegetables, miso and tempeh, raw onions and garlic, asparagus and Jerusalem artichoke.

How to Avoid LGS

The best way to avoid LGS is to avoid the list of roots causes above. In addition to that, supporting your gut health and your immune health is key with prebiotic and probiotic rich foods daily and stick to a whole foods diet as much as you can (I like an 80/20 plan).

Uses herbs and supplements as needed on an individualized basis.  I don’t recommend specifics here because everyone has different needs and a different constitution and thus each plan should be targeted for your health needs instead of generalized. 

Sources

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25734566
  2. https://chriskresser.com/how-stress-wreaks-havoc-on-your-gut/
  3. Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Therapeutics in Nutrition. CA: Bauman College
  4. Nichols, T. & Faas, N. (2005) Optimal Digestive Health. VT: Healing Arts Press.
  5. http://www.functionalmedicineuniversity.com/public/leaky-gut.cfm

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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Consuming Soy and it’s Dangers

Vegetarian and Vegan Diets:

What you need to know about Soy in your diet

soy-beans

If you avoid foods with a face, you may end up consuming a lot of soy to meet your protein needs. While not all soy is bad, the type that most Americans eat is not the healthy type of soy and it may be doing more harm than good for your body. 

What Type of Soy to Avoid/Minimize in your Diet

  • Processed soy products such as soy burgers and hot dogs
  • Soy protein powder
  • Soy infant formula (if you can)
  • Soybean oil (use avocado, EVOO, coconut)
  • Soy cheese (use grass fed, raw cheese , goat cheese or avoid)
  • Soy nuts (eat tree nuts if you can tolerate)
  • Soy milk (drink nut milks, coconut milk)
  • Tofu (most of it is GMO and many lack the enzyme to digest this unfermented soy food) (6 )
  • Soy nut butter (try nut butters or sunflower butter)
  • soy sauce (use coconut aminos instead)

Much of the soy that is consumed in the U.S. comes from packaged and processed soy products. You may be even consuming more soy than you realize since soy is cheap and has been added to many processed packaged foods.  (3)

Soy is used as an oil, as a thickener, flavor enhancer, stabilizer, preservative and a filler. (4)  If you are eating processed foods, the odds are you are eating processed soy.

School lunch programs even add soy to their hamburger patties. Studies show that soy may not be good for a growing and developing child. (5). Have your child bring a lunch from home instead.

What You Need to Know About Soy

soy-no

The forms I mentioned above are unhealthy for various reasons, such as;

  • Soy is high in oxalates. (2) While there are other foods that are high in oxalates as well, many vegans/vegetarians consume soy daily and multiple times per day. A buildup of oxalates can interfere with the body’s metabolic processes and can contribute to autism, ADD, COPD, asthma, cystic Fibrosis, vulvodynia, AI disease and low thyroid. (1)
  • Soy is a GMO crop. This means that the crop has been engineered to withstand spraying of roundup on the crop. When you consume processed soy products you are consuming GMO’s. (Roundup-also called glyphosate-can lead to leaky gut syndrome, and can disrupt the endocrine system.) (1)
  • Aluminum and arsenic have also been found in GMO soy. (1)
  • Soybean oil is high in omega 6’s. While we need omega 6 fatty acids, we consume too many which leads to inflammation in the body. (7)
  • Soy contains isoflavones that function as endocrine disruptors. These isoflavones which are plant compounds can activate estrogen receptors in the body. (7)
  • Soy isoflavones can also cause breast cancer. Studies are conflicting on the pros and cons for breast health. (3)
  • Soy can impair thyroid function. The isoflavones found in soy can function as goitrogens which are substances that can interfere with thyroid function. (3).
  • Soy formula for babies is low in fat and babies need fat. Soy formula is also too high in manganese and this can lead to ADHD symptoms.  It is also high in aluminum.  (1) Think about it, you are also giving your baby a high amount of genistein (an isoflavone) which can impact your child’s hormones down the road.  (5)
  • The phytoestrogens can also contribute to andropause in men (7)
  • Because of the excess estrogen from a diet filled with processed soy, it can contribute to estrogen dominance in women and PMS symptoms along with breast cancer, PCOS, cervical cancer and other hormone imbalance disorders such as girls reaching their menstruation as an early age. (4) . These hormone properties are from genistein which is the main isoflavone found in soy.  (5)
  • Introducing compounds that mimic estrogen could upset the body balance and may lead to long term impact on behavior and brain chemistry. (5)
  • Soy products can cause vitamin B12 deficiency. Soy contains B12 analogs.  These analogs block the uptake of true B12 so your needs actually increase.    But these B12 analogs cannot be used by your body the way it would use real B12. (6) 

What Type of Soy Can You Eat?

tempeh food bowl

Types of Soy to add to your diet

  • Fermented soy is a great choice. But even so, this should not be the bulk of your diet.  Even fermented soy will contain isoflavones: add in tempeh, miso and natto. Even fermented soy can be GMO so be sure to check the label and purchase organic (4). Fermented foods contain probiotics which a healthy gut needs.
  • Soybeans in whole form are rich in micronutrients and can be a good source of plant protein but don’t go overboard and make this your main protein source since soybeans are high in omega 6 essential fatty acids which can lead to inflammation if over consumed.

Bottom Line

You can still enjoy your soy-You don’t need to completely remove your favorite foods with soy in them (unless you have an allergy or food sensitivity to soy) but you should reduce the amount in your diet based on the reasons above and replace them with other healthy vegetarian food options. 

Opt for fermented non-GMO soy but still don’t go overboard and make it a small portion of your diet.  If you want to add in fermented foods, rotate your fermented soy with other options such as fermented vegetables, kimchi and fermented goat milk kefir or coconut kefir.  In the end, fermented soy has its benefits and processed soy does not.  Choose wisely.

If you are a vegetarian or vegan who eats a lot of soy and are confused about what to eat if you take soy out of your diet, give me a call and I can help you find the right options for you!

 

Resources

  1. https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/glyphosate/Seneff/Yale2015.pptx
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15998131
  3. https://authoritynutrition.com/is-soy-bad-for-you-or-good/
  4. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/5-ways-to-soy-upsets-hormone-balance/
  5. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/soybean-fertility-hormone-isoflavones-genestein/
  6. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/02/15/how-to-avoid-the-most-dangerous-side-effect-of-veganism.aspx
  7. Bauman, E. & Friedlander, J. (2014) Foundations in Nutrition. CA: Bauman College

 

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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