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Cheesy Garbanzo Bean Stir Fry

Cheesy Garbanzo Stir Fry

Gluten, soy, dairy free, vegetarian, vegan

This is a good recipe to make a large batch of and use for lunches for the next few days. It is also good cold!  Whether you are a vegetarian or not, it is good to have some meatless meals on occasion.  

Ingredients

  • 2 T. avocado oil
  • 1 t. dried oregano
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 large zucchini chopped
  • ½ c. mushrooms sliced
  • 1 can garbanzo beans drained and rinsed
  • 1 tomato chopped
  • 1 bell pepper chopped
  • 2 T. nutritional yeast

Directions.

  1. Heat the oil in a skillet and add in the garlic and oregano and sauté for a minute. Add in the zucchini, bell pepper, mushrooms and the beans.  Cook on medium heat for around 10 minutes until vegetables are cooked through. 
  2. Add in the tomato and cook for another 5 minutes.
  3. At the end, add in the yeast and blend in.
  4. Serve and enjoy! This dish would be good with cauliflower rice. 
Cheesy Garbanzo Bean Stir Fry
Serves 2
A vegan/vegetarian dish that is gluten, soy and dairy free. A good source of protein, complex carbs, fiber, and healthy fats along with several vegetables
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262 calories
44 g
0 g
5 g
14 g
1 g
438 g
333 g
9 g
0 g
3 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
438g
Servings
2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 262
Calories from Fat 44
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 5g
8%
Saturated Fat 1g
3%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 333mg
14%
Total Carbohydrates 44g
15%
Dietary Fiber 6g
22%
Sugars 9g
Protein 14g
Vitamin A
55%
Vitamin C
192%
Calcium
11%
Iron
16%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. • 2 T. avocado oil
  2. • 1 t. dried oregano
  3. • 2 cloves garlic minced
  4. • 1 large zucchini chopped
  5. • ½ c. mushrooms sliced
  6. • 1 can garbanzo beans drained and rinsed
  7. • 1 tomato chopped
  8. • 1 bell pepper chopped
  9. • 2 T. nutritional yeast
Instructions
  1. 1. Heat the oil in a skillet and add in the garlic and oregano and sauté for a minute. Add in the zucchini, bell pepper, mushrooms and the beans. Cook on medium heat for around 10 minutes until vegetables are cooked through.
  2. 2. Add in the tomato and cook for another 5 minutes.
  3. 3. At the end, add in the yeast and blend in.
  4. 4. Serve and enjoy! This dish would be good with cauliflower rice.
Notes
  1. If you are a vegan/vegetarian, nutritional yeast can be a good source of B12.
beta
calories
262
fat
5g
protein
14g
carbs
44g
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TruFoods Nutrition http://trufoodsnutrition.com/

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition and Herbalist is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and If Life is So Good, Then Why AM I Still Depressed? Discover the root cause for your depression and learn what to do to feel better and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Want more information, like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

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What to Purchase Organic

What to Buy Organic and What to save your money on

by Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, BCHN, Herbalist

basket of veggies

 

Clean 15:

These are the foods known to have the least amount of pesticide residue. It does not mean they do not have any, just lower amounts and fewer of these chemicals. 

Conventional foods on the clean 15 list are in a low risk category and while not organic, these can be considered similar to organic. This is a good place to save your money and instead splurge on organic for the items on the dirty dozen list which are the foods that rank in the medium or high risk category for amounts of pesticides. Almost one third of the product the USDA has tested has residue from 2 or more pesticides.

Many of these chemicals that are on your food has been known to have carcinogenic or endocrine disrupting properties. This can contribute to hormone related cancer and reproductive disorders.  While your liver works to detox your body of these and many other toxins, with the modern diet along with toxins in air, water and soil, our livers become overburdened.  Minimize your risk to pesticides as much as you can. 

 

Shopping Guide

Did you know that the EPA sets safety limits for individual pesticides but they do not take into consideration the total load of combined pesticides on human health?  For instance, recent data from the USDA’s Pesticide Program found 17 different pesticide residues on nectarines, 19 on celery, and 25 on peaches.  Broccoli, green beans and nectarines had residues that exceeded EPA safe limits.  Think about the total load of all these pesticides in your body and the body of your children next time you shop. 

OK to buy Conventional

asparagus

·        Onions

·        Pineapple

·        Avocado

·        Asparagus

·        Sweet peas

·        Mangoes

·        Eggplant

·        Cantaloupe

·        Kiwi

·        Cabbage

·        Watermelon

·        Sweet potato

·        Grapefruit

·        Mushroom

These products even when farmed conventionally are among the lowest in pesticide residues, hormones and/or antibiotics. 

          Buy Organic

apples

·        Apples

·        Celery

·        Strawberries

·        Peaches

·        Spinach

·        Nectarines

·        Grapes

·        Sweet bell peppers

·        Potatoes

·        Blueberries

·        Lettuce

·        Kale/collards

·        Baby food

·        Coffee

·        Dairy products

·        Hot peppers

·        Leafy greens

·        Meat

·        Nuts

·        Nut butters

These products when farmed conventionally are among the highest in pesticide residues, hormones and or/antibiotics. 

                                                            

Don’t forget!

Jan 15th, Sunday 2-3:30 @ Castle Rock, CO Philip S. Miller Library

Start the new year off right and sustain your goals this year!  I will show you how. 

RSVP to trufoodsnutrition@yahoo.com as space is limited.

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition  is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, then like her fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

 

Sources

www.ewg.org 

www.naturalgrocers.com

 

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Eighth Recipe of Christmas: Quinoa with Herbs and Vegetbales

Quinoa with Herbs and Vegetables

This makes a great side dish. Make plenty so that you can add protein to the quinoa and take to work for lunch the next day.

quinoa-recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 c. quinoa
  • 3 T. EVOO
  • 1 onion diced
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 c. peas (fresh or frozen)
  • Dash sea salt
  • 1 t. dried oregano
  • 1 t. thyme leaves
  • 1 t. dried rosemary
  • 2 c. chicken broth or bone broth
  • ½ c. chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 T. almond slivers

Directions

  1. Rinse the quinoa by placing it in a fine mesh strainer and running it under water for a minute. Let it drain while you cook the onions
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons EVOO on medium high heat in your skillet. Add the chopped onion and sauté until it is slightly brown.  Add the quinoa and stir for a couple minutes until the quinoa is lightly toasted. 
  3. Push the quinoa to the side and add in the other tablespoon of EVOO. Add in the minced garlic and the herbs. Sauté for 30 seconds. 
  4. Add in the broth, peas and salt and stir. Cover with a lid and bring to a boil, then let it simmer for about 20 minutes. 
  5. Check now. All the liquid should be gone.  If the quinoa is too hard then add a little more liquid and let it simmer a few more minutes. 
  6. Stir in the parsley and the almonds and serve. Serve with protein and a vegetable.  Use the leftovers to make a quinoa bowl for next days lunch. 

Free Nutrition Seminar to start the year off right coming up on Jan. 15th, 2017.  Go to https://facebook.com/Trufoodsnutrition

 

If you are sick and tired of feeling sick, tired, fatigued, depressed, anxious and more and have given up hope then Karen’s simple, effective, individualized and sustainable approach may be what you need. 

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition (candidate) is the author of Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide; How Food Supplements and herbs can be used to lift your mood and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC. 

For more information visit her site at  www.trufoodsnutrition.com

Get her Food Swap Guide here to get started on your health journey today! Want more information, then like here fb page here

As a nutrition professional, Karen does not treat, cure nor diagnose. This information is for educational purposes only.

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Five Servings of Vegetables per day: Here is how to get them in

How to get a days worth of vegetables into one meal!

salad picture

While in a perfect world we would get our veggies in at every meal and snack but the reality is few do.  Here is an example of how to get as many veggies into one meal! 

Salads: the easy way to get your veggie intake

I love salads!  It is the easiest way to get your share of veggies.  Here is what is in the salad in the picture as an example

  • dark leafy greens: I buy a box of mixed organic greens so that I get a variety
  • red onion (the darker color of the red onion versus the white onion means for more phytonutrients. Onions are also prebiotics)
  • asparagus tips (raw asparagus is a prebiotic which is essentially food for your probiotics)
  • cucumber (I buy organic so I can leave the skin on which will provide me with more nutrients)
  • shredded cabbage and carrot blend: I make it easy on myself and buy this in a bag which contains red and green cabbage. 
  • carrots: we have a farmers share for the summer.  Since I know my source I just slice them.  Yup, leave some of the dirt residue on and leave the skin on!
  • pea pods, sugar snap peas: again, we have been getting them from the farmers share.  Off season I buy them in the store. 
  • Dressing: I use a high quality EVOO which adds a rich flavor to my dressing and makes all the difference in the world!  I use this EVOO for mainly raw dishes.  I add in balsamic vinegar, raw minced garlic and fresh herbs. I have herbs growing in pots on my deck so I just cut what I need.  I chop up some basil, rosemary, thyme, cilantro and parsley and toss it all into the dressing. 

And there you have it-one salad and I have just eaten fresh herbs and roughly 11 different veggies.  If I had mushrooms I may have added this in. I grow my own sprouts but didn’t have any ready for this salad.  Sprouts are nutrient dense and contain protein.    I don’t eat many nightshades but otherwise I would have added in chopped pepper and tomatoes. 

The salad in the picture is a bit smaller as most often I put my salad in a large bowl to make it the main portion of my meal.  You can toss in proteins such as steak, seafood or chicken to make it a meal. 

I just wanted to show you that it is not as hard as you think to get all your veggies in one day!

Enjoy!

Karen Brennan, MSW, CNC, author of the “Tru Foods Depression Free Nutrition Guide.” and owner of Tru Foods Nutrition Services, LLC believes in food first when addressing root causes of your health condition.  For more information, visit her website at www.trufoodsnutrition.com

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